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The future of surgical technology comes with Augmented ...

In 2016, the augmented reality (AR) market was valued at $2.3 billion. By 2023, the market is expected to reach a whopping $61.3 billion. That’s because augmented reality is no longer limited to the field of 3D technology. Industries such as medicine and education are benefiting from it, too.

Just recently, Philips has unveiled a mixed reality concept co-developed with Microsoft, which will showcase augmented reality applications for minimally invasive and image-guided therapies. The augmented reality concept is based on Philips’ Azurion image-guided therapy platform and Microsoft’s HoloLens 2 holographic computing platform. CathLab Digest defines HoloLens as a self-contained holographic computer that enables hands-free, heads-up interaction with 3-dimensional digital objects. It is complemented by existing and new Azure cloud services and it has a built-in AI that makes it an intelligent edge device.

The tech will benefit surgeons by converting information usually displayed on a 2D screen into a 3D holographic augmented reality environment. This can intuitively be controlled by a medical professional. Atul Gupta, chief medical officer for Image Guided Therapy at Philips, believes that transitioning from open surgery to image-guided procedures has improved patient outcomes and reduced costs because the patient spends less time in the hospital. “On our Azurion platform, we seamlessly integrate a range of data sources in a way that is intuitive to understand and control. This concept allows me to see the real world superimposed with the live data and 3D medical imagery needed to guide our precision therapy.”

Med-Tech News explains that during a minimally invasive procedure using augmented reality, a physician cannot directly see or touch the treatment area. They will rely on advanced medical imaging technologies like an ultra-low dose of ultrasound and X-ray imaging. Other navigation technologies will be used, too, to help see inside the patient and guide the physician’s actions.

Microsoft’s AI and mixed reality technical expert Alex Kipman says mixed reality holds great potential in healthcare: “Our collaboration with Philips shows how that potential is already beginning to be realized. Mixed reality is giving people new ways to interact with the digital and physical world, bringing the benefits of the digital revolution to entirely new experiences across the globe.”

Healthcare is at the forefront of integrating AR and AI into its industry and is also where the latest cutting edge technology is being trialed and implemented. Maryville University’s outlook for software development graduates reveals how by 2024 there is expected to be a 17% growth in jobs – no doubt due to the advancement of tech like AR and AI. As more graduates become part of the software industry, so too will the number who enter, and subsequently help improve healthcare and medicine, as a result. This will lead to a more widespread use of augmented reality surgical technology.

Augmented reality is not only being used for medical procedures - it can also be used to revolutionize the treatment of developmental disorders like Autism Spectrum Disorder. Although it’s still in a relatively early stage, augmented reality solutions may be just the technology that could revolutionize how ASD is treated as we’ve pointed out in a story we wrote on The Silver Logic. Healthcare technology is advancing very fast and the future looks very bright.

In 2016, the augmented reality (AR) market was valued at $2.3 billion. By 2023, the market is expected to reach a whopping $61.3 billion. That’s because augmented reality is no longer limited to the field of 3D technology. Industries such as medicine and education are benefiting from it, too.

Just recently, Philips has unveiled a mixed reality concept co-developed with Microsoft, which will showcase augmented reality applications for minimally invasive and image-guided therapies. The augmented reality concept is based on Philips’ Azurion image-guided therapy platform and Microsoft’s HoloLens 2 holographic computing platform. CathLab Digest defines HoloLens as a self-contained holographic computer that enables hands-free, heads-up interaction with 3-dimensional digital objects. It is complemented by existing and new Azure cloud services and it has a built-in AI that makes it an intelligent edge device.

The tech will benefit surgeons by converting information usually displayed on a 2D screen into a 3D holographic augmented reality environment. This can intuitively be controlled by a medical professional. Atul Gupta, chief medical officer for Image Guided Therapy at Philips, believes that transitioning from open surgery to image-guided procedures has improved patient outcomes and reduced costs because the patient spends less time in the hospital. “On our Azurion platform, we seamlessly integrate a range of data sources in a way that is intuitive to understand and control. This concept allows me to see the real world superimposed with the live data and 3D medical imagery needed to guide our precision therapy.”

Med-Tech News explains that during a minimally invasive procedure using augmented reality, a physician cannot directly see or touch the treatment area. They will rely on advanced medical imaging technologies like an ultra-low dose of ultrasound and X-ray imaging. Other navigation technologies will be used, too, to help see inside the patient and guide the physician’s actions.

Microsoft’s AI and mixed reality technical expert Alex Kipman says mixed reality holds great potential in healthcare: “Our collaboration with Philips shows how that potential is already beginning to be realized. Mixed reality is giving people new ways to interact with the digital and physical world, bringing the benefits of the digital revolution to entirely new experiences across the globe.”

Healthcare is at the forefront of integrating AR and AI into its industry and is also where the latest cutting edge technology is being trialed and implemented. Maryville University’s outlook for software development graduates reveals how by 2024 there is expected to be a 17% growth in jobs – no doubt due to the advancement of tech like AR and AI. As more graduates become part of the software industry, so too will the number who enter, and subsequently help improve healthcare and medicine, as a result. This will lead to a more widespread use of augmented reality surgical technology.

Augmented reality is not only being used for medical procedures - it can also be used to revolutionize the treatment of developmental disorders like Autism Spectrum Disorder. Although it’s still in a relatively early stage, augmented reality solutions may be just the technology that could revolutionize how ASD is treated as we’ve pointed out in a story we wrote on The Silver Logic. Healthcare technology is advancing very fast and the future looks very bright.

10 great practical examples of Consumer-focused augmented ...

With much of the press around augmented reality focused on breakthrough games like Pokémon Go and the seeming ubiquity of Augmented Reality (AR) photo filters, it can be easy to miss just how many practical use cases for AR already exist in the marketplace. With major new SDK releases from Apple, Google, and Facebook in the last year, AR is poised to become more and more a part of everyday life.

With much of the press around augmented reality focused on breakthrough games like Pokémon Go and the seeming ubiquity of Augmented Reality (AR) photo filters, it can be easy to miss just how many practical use cases for AR already exist in the marketplace. With major new SDK releases from Apple, Google, and Facebook in the last year, AR is poised to become more and more a part of everyday life.

LEVELS | An AR Hurricane Hackathon App

Teams from The SilverLogic had an incredible showing at eMerge Americas in Miami Beach in 2018, taking home second-place prizes in both the eMerge Visa Challenge and the overall hackathon.

Our prize-winning entry into the 2018 eMerge Americas Hackathon was Levels, an augmented reality solution for iOS that aids in disaster preparedness for low-lying coastal areas and also includes a missing person finder for after a natural disaster. Speaking in the final pitch to a South Florida audience, CEO David Hartmann said, “We all remember [Hurricane] Irma very well. I’m from Germany and haven't lived here long enough to know what this is all about; I was pretty lost, but I wasn’t the only one. I found visualizations from The Weather Channel very useful, so we wanted to take that a step further.”

 


The idea behind the AR portion of the solution was simple: By visualizing potential flood levels in real-time, it would help users get a much better sense of what different levels of storm surge could really do to different properties. The app also contained a supply calculator that estimates the number of sandbags needed in order to ward off different levels of flooding based on different elements of the property to be protected.

But when disaster strikes, protecting one’s property is far less important than protecting one’s loved ones. Even though the worst of Irma missed South Florida, thousands were temporarily displaced to shelters that were often overcrowded and chaotic. The most stressful moment of any disaster that compromises communications or power grids is not knowing whether friends and family are safe. To that end, Levels includes a built-in ‘Missing Person Finder’ that uses an integrated facial recognition tool from Kairos to match a current photo with one that would be stored in a central database. For privacy reasons, Levels does not give the actual location of the individual – but a confirmed check in via the app would post that person as accounted for and provide peace of mind until more thorough communication channels are restored.

Levels is a prototype project at this point, but it utilizes a number of innovative APIs (from Kairos and Cloudinary) and iOS technologies (ARKit) that allowed this working prototype to be built in under 24 hours. We believe Levels could be extremely useful as both a standalone app or as an integration into an existing product. We are excited about building it out with more features in the very near future.

Teams from The SilverLogic had an incredible showing at eMerge Americas in Miami Beach in 2018, taking home second-place prizes in both the eMerge Visa Challenge and the overall hackathon.

Our prize-winning entry into the 2018 eMerge Americas Hackathon was Levels, an augmented reality solution for iOS that aids in disaster preparedness for low-lying coastal areas and also includes a missing person finder for after a natural disaster. Speaking in the final pitch to a South Florida audience, CEO David Hartmann said, “We all remember [Hurricane] Irma very well. I’m from Germany and haven't lived here long enough to know what this is all about; I was pretty lost, but I wasn’t the only one. I found visualizations from The Weather Channel very useful, so we wanted to take that a step further.”

 


The idea behind the AR portion of the solution was simple: By visualizing potential flood levels in real-time, it would help users get a much better sense of what different levels of storm surge could really do to different properties. The app also contained a supply calculator that estimates the number of sandbags needed in order to ward off different levels of flooding based on different elements of the property to be protected.

But when disaster strikes, protecting one’s property is far less important than protecting one’s loved ones. Even though the worst of Irma missed South Florida, thousands were temporarily displaced to shelters that were often overcrowded and chaotic. The most stressful moment of any disaster that compromises communications or power grids is not knowing whether friends and family are safe. To that end, Levels includes a built-in ‘Missing Person Finder’ that uses an integrated facial recognition tool from Kairos to match a current photo with one that would be stored in a central database. For privacy reasons, Levels does not give the actual location of the individual – but a confirmed check in via the app would post that person as accounted for and provide peace of mind until more thorough communication channels are restored.

Levels is a prototype project at this point, but it utilizes a number of innovative APIs (from Kairos and Cloudinary) and iOS technologies (ARKit) that allowed this working prototype to be built in under 24 hours. We believe Levels could be extremely useful as both a standalone app or as an integration into an existing product. We are excited about building it out with more features in the very near future.

AR games | Cryptoquest (Blockchain Hackathon)

We’ve talked a lot on our blog about making ideas happen with augmented reality and the internet of things, but we haven’t spent much time yet on the ideas we’ve actually turned into a reality here at The SilverLogic (TSL). This week, we’ll be featuring two of our in-house augmented reality favorites, OmniPark and Cryptoquest.

We’ve talked a lot on our blog about making ideas happen with augmented reality and the internet of things, but we haven’t spent much time yet on the ideas we’ve actually turned into a reality here at The SilverLogic (TSL). This week, we’ll be featuring two of our in-house augmented reality favorites, OmniPark and Cryptoquest.

TSL's Augmented Reality App OmniPark: Money 20/20 Overall ...

At The SilverLogic, we spend a lot of time thinking about the future and how to make ideas happen for our clients. An area of great interest to us is the future of money and payments, and we’re thrilled to have a chance to meet up with global FinTech leaders to talk about all the latest trends, disruptions, and opportunities in the global FinTech ecosystem.

We’ve talked a lot on our blog about making ideas happen with augmented reality and the internet of things, but we haven’t spent much time yet on the ideas we’ve actually turned into a reality here at TSL. So, we will be featuring OmniPark, one of our favorite projects utilizing augmented reality.

At The SilverLogic, we spend a lot of time thinking about the future and how to make ideas happen for our clients. An area of great interest to us is the future of money and payments, and we’re thrilled to have a chance to meet up with global FinTech leaders to talk about all the latest trends, disruptions, and opportunities in the global FinTech ecosystem.

We’ve talked a lot on our blog about making ideas happen with augmented reality and the internet of things, but we haven’t spent much time yet on the ideas we’ve actually turned into a reality here at TSL. So, we will be featuring OmniPark, one of our favorite projects utilizing augmented reality.

Facebook expands the reach of AR experiences with Target ...

Amidst a worsening data harvesting controversy, updates to its advertising platform to prevent abuses such potential election meddling, and anticipation of CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s Congressional testimony next week, you could be forgiven for forgetting that Facebook also develops technology products outside of Ads and Newsfeed.

Amidst a worsening data harvesting controversy, updates to its advertising platform to prevent abuses such potential election meddling, and anticipation of CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s Congressional testimony next week, you could be forgiven for forgetting that Facebook also develops technology products outside of Ads and Newsfeed.

Autism and AR: Building AR Solutions for Autism Spectrum ...

Despite affecting more than 3.5 million Americans and 1 in 68 newborn children in the US, Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) remains poorly understood by the general public. At its core, ASD is a complex developmental disorder that affects a person’s abilities in social interaction and communication. These symptoms can look very different from individual to individual, and the severity of symptoms can range from moderate to profound. The goal of treatment for ASD has always been an improvement in quality of life, and this typically takes the form of training and practice in social cues and communication.

Despite affecting more than 3.5 million Americans and 1 in 68 newborn children in the US, Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) remains poorly understood by the general public. At its core, ASD is a complex developmental disorder that affects a person’s abilities in social interaction and communication. These symptoms can look very different from individual to individual, and the severity of symptoms can range from moderate to profound. The goal of treatment for ASD has always been an improvement in quality of life, and this typically takes the form of training and practice in social cues and communication.

AR Glasses | Magic Leap’s Creator Portal, Lumin SDK

It’s been a big week in mixed and Augmented Reality as Florida’s own Magic Leap finally opened its Creator Portal and took center stage at the 2018 Game Developers Conference in San Francisco. The notoriously secretive company has been promising an SDK and developer portal for years, and it seems we finally have (some) idea of how the technology will work and how third-party developers will be able to build for it.

It’s been a big week in mixed and Augmented Reality as Florida’s own Magic Leap finally opened its Creator Portal and took center stage at the 2018 Game Developers Conference in San Francisco. The notoriously secretive company has been promising an SDK and developer portal for years, and it seems we finally have (some) idea of how the technology will work and how third-party developers will be able to build for it.

How AR can transform Art & Music

“To many, technology seems unapproachable. But through art, technology becomes more human and even an artistic medium in its own right.”

 

-Heather Day, abstract expressionist and Facebook Artist-in-Residence

“To many, technology seems unapproachable. But through art, technology becomes more human and even an artistic medium in its own right.”

 

-Heather Day, abstract expressionist and Facebook Artist-in-Residence

Transforming How Users Experience Reality with AR & MR

So far on our blog, we’ve spent a lot of time on what’s broadly called ‘Practical AR.’ We’ve looked at use cases in which AR solves everyday problems like what furniture to buy or what artwork would look good in your living room, and we’ve highlighted how ARKit and ARCore are helping developers make dynamic AR experiences on the phones everyone already has. Augmented Reality Apps.

So far on our blog, we’ve spent a lot of time on what’s broadly called ‘Practical AR.’ We’ve looked at use cases in which AR solves everyday problems like what furniture to buy or what artwork would look good in your living room, and we’ve highlighted how ARKit and ARCore are helping developers make dynamic AR experiences on the phones everyone already has. Augmented Reality Apps.

AR Wearables Today

In our Business Applications of Augmented Reality (AR) whitepaper, we wrote about the roadblocks to getting consumers to get excited about augmented reality wearables:

In our Business Applications of Augmented Reality (AR) whitepaper, we wrote about the roadblocks to getting consumers to get excited about augmented reality wearables:

Building the Future with ARCore, Google's Augmented Reality ...

ARCore, Google’s augmented reality SDK for Android, has largely taken a backseat to Apple’s ARKit SDK in the press. With the usual talk of a tech war popping up within days of Google’s ARCore launch announcement, it’s understandable that the two development environments are often talked about as if they are fundamentally different products engaged in a kind of augmented reality arms race.

ARCore, Google’s augmented reality SDK for Android, has largely taken a backseat to Apple’s ARKit SDK in the press. With the usual talk of a tech war popping up within days of Google’s ARCore launch announcement, it’s understandable that the two development environments are often talked about as if they are fundamentally different products engaged in a kind of augmented reality arms race.

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